Friday, 27 December 2013

CHRISTMAS FEVER

 Still in the spirit of Christmas, Mrs. Uzor takes us through the rush of Christmas. I hope you enjoy it.



Christmas is a time to share and show love. Most often exchange of gifts is made. From corporate organizations who indulge their esteemed clients with elaborate corporate gift items, hampers, and the likes to the common man on the street who remembers to buy a card or two for a loved. One thing is certain everyone loves and wants to give something. The tradition of the sacred Christmas rice and chicken and the famous Christmas cloth is one that will live with us for a very long time. I happen to be one of those who have been bitten by this bug. As I strolled into the market on the 24th to do my last minute shopping (if you really can avoid falling into this trap the better for you) I was in awe as I saw the crowd at the market. Market stalls were filled to the brim; stocked full with a variety of food items. From the ever popular live chicken or turkey (tolotolo as we used to call it back in the days) to the carrots, spring onions, tomatoes, etc., the list is endless and everyone was buying. I almost giggled to myself (chai Nigerians sef!) sellers were doing everything possible to persuade buyers. Some sellers were more innovative than others. I remember seeing the chicken sellers on the street in traffic soliciting buyers  to buy their wares, offering to bring it out to them in traffic so they wouldn't have to come down into the market (hmm Niger! We no dey carry last). The tempo was high so were the prices of goods. They skyrocket through the roof. It was not uncommon to hear one or two buyers hiss and sigh on hearing the prices of these goods. But they didn't have a choice. Some had to adjust and buy less than they wanted to while others threw caution to the wind and became over-indulged. Even the okada riders were not left out in the buzz. A ride that used to cost a hundred naira now cost one hundred and fifty naira. Did I forget to mention the traffic congestion on the roads? (Whew! It tied wrapper with nine knots like one of my favourite radio presenters would say). Everyone had caught the fever, the Christmas fever. So what can we do to avoid falling into this trap every year? I think effective planning and shopping ahead of time would help. For the efficient housewife this would be the norm. It would also be nice to have online shopping for food items and groceries. I can imagine visiting jumia.com or konga.com and ordering for a live fowl (I would like to see how they deliver that). However I feel that some people just enjoy the hassle and buzz involved in last minute preparation. I hate to say this but I think am one of them. Xoxo… lol.

Wednesday, 25 December 2013

Trip Down Memory Lane: Christmas as a Growing Child

We wish all our esteemed readers Merry Christmas. We are still writing because you guys kept reading.
While thinking last night on what articles should be on the site today, the subject of Christmas and growing up crossed my mind. This article is obviously a random one and I will be writing as events cross my mind.



Christmas as a growing child; it was fun, fun, and fun. As a growing child, I lived in a compound (what is called a public yard in Nigeria), just like most Nigerian kids.
A yard comprises of several houses within a fenced or unfenced wall, usually owned by the same person. In our own case, it was fenced and we had five to six other families living in the same compound.
My parents weren't wealthy and that made Christmas even more of an exciting period.

Before I continue, let me deviate to rich kids. From are far, we watched rich kids from afar. They had toys and games (Sega, PlayStation 1 and 2). They obviously go shopping and they entertain visitor. Etc.

As an average kid growing up Christmas started with the cool harmattan breeze and dry lips. I believed and still believe that injuries sustained during this period hardly heal. Hence, I had to be very careful when I play. After blowing of harmattan breeze comes vacation of schools and then anticipation for the D-day.
In anticipation I waited for Christmas rice, Christmas chicken, and above all, Christmas cloth.

Every parent knew that without the Christmas cloth there was no Christmas for your child and some had to borrow money to provide. God bless our parents.

The eve of Christmas was troublesome. I rolled from one edge of my small form to another. I dreamt about Christmas and most often I wake up several times in the night. "Kukuruku" the cork crowed; yes it is Christmas day and I was out to show them what I had.
Rice had three options; white, fried, or jollof
Chicken had two options; ordinary or fried.

The joy that follows plucking the feathers of the chicken if mum both a live one was immeasurable. Yes we've been eating rice but Christmas rice is special. As growing boys, we watched mum do all the cooking.

"Food don don, oya make una come chop", mum calls. We eat, and it is off we go, I and my friends.
Christmas as a child meant going house to house and expecting money. We preferred money to your food.
What else went with Christmas? Eh-mm, knock-outs (bangers) were also the order of the day. I wasn't really into that as dad will beat the living day-light out of you if you are caught.



As I write this article, some kids came knocking. Sometimes I wish I didn't grow up. To every Nigerian kid out there and to my readers, Merry Christmas and a happy new year in advance.

Tuesday, 24 December 2013

Exclusive Interview with Outstanding Clothing

Featuring on the blog today is one of Africa's finest. She is a very young and talented lady, a student, and a designer. I wouldn't be mistaken if I call her a stylist. Join us as we explore the world of this lady, miss Precious Adigboluja.




9jafrik: Can we please meet you?
Precious: My name is Precious Adigboluja, I am from Ogun State. I am a designer, fun-loving person, very passionate, talented, down-to-earth, and a huge music fan. I also love to cook, not a fan of laziness.

9jafrik:
You say you are a designer, do you have a brand, and what is it about?
Precious: Yes I do, my brand name is Outstanding Clothing, and it is a unisex clothing brand.
To talk about a true "fashionista" to the core, "Outstanding Clothing" is full of uniqueness, star trend, difference, passion, outrage, beauty, style, envy, and the colors of nature, suitable, frills to thrill, cultural, perfectly mixed, sexy, and creative, amongst other
Our works of wears range from shirt to blazers, customized jeans, newly created natives, customized Polo(s)/T-shirts, jalamia and host of other styles.

9jafrik: Why did you choose fashion or rather how did you meet fashion?
Precious: Well, it's in the family. Fashion is like my baby, when I design I feel happy and proud of myself. I love nature, the environment and culture and that's my inspiration. Fashion is my passion and it comes from within.

9jafrik: How long have you been in the business?
Precious: Professionally, for 1 year now.

9jafrik: Can you tell us about your educational background?
Precious: My primary school was St. Catherine at Surlere, Secondary school was at Lagos State Model College, Badore and I am presently a student of Redeemer's University where I study English.

9jafrik: As a designer, what can you say is your fashion turn-on?
Precious: Desire, dreams and the power of emotions.




9jafrik: What are your fashion must-haves?
Precious: Waist watch, jeans, perfume, shoes and good cloths.

9jafrik: What should we be expecting from you in the coming years?
Precious: A lot! Because Outstanding Clothing is going world-wide by God's grace. Bigger and higher things are forth-coming.

9jafrik:
Thanks for your time, Precious.


Contact Details
Phone: 08181893880
Bbm: 25A8EFC5
Twitter: @mzcutebee, @irepoutstanding







Monday, 23 December 2013

Dressing Tips

Welcome dear readers, it's my delight to bring you tips on how to dress. We do not know it all. Hence, we need to be constantly informed so we don't miss out of this-day's fashion.


Tips on how to dress:
  • Wear clothes that fits: Some of us don't wear fitted clothes and thereby won't look admirable in any attire we choose. If you want to get the attention of people, wear fitted clothes, not too tight, not too big....let it just fit your figures.


This picture was gotten from Japan fashion week. Pictured above is Ne-Net

  • Learn to match colors appropriately: While color blocking is invoked in the fashion world, we should learn how not to overdo things. Matching the right colors appropriately will lead people to dress like you and by so doing you are one step ahead of them.
  • Iron your clothes properly before use: We have electricity issues here but that's not the perfect excuse for you to wear clothes that are not ironed. Remember that you are addressed the way you are dressed. Common, there are many other ways you can iron your clothes without NEPA so do the right thing always.

  • Apply Cologne with mild fragrance: I'm sure you won't want people to sneeze and cough when you pass by them or when you're around, wear mild cologne (perfumes, body spray etc.).


  • Your fingers and hair should be well trimmed: Guys, no one wants a tattered looking guy with bushy hair for a boyfriend so make sure you trim your hair and fingers when you spot them growing. Ladies, no one wants a lady who doesn’t know how to take care of herself for a girlfriend. So, take care of your hair, if it’s fixing, do so, is its braiding, then do so but just don't look tattered.

What about your nails? Must I tell you? Make sure they are not dirty, fix your nails if you want to but always make sure that they are short and neat.

Last but not the least, I know some guys and ladies are known for this but please, do not, I repeat do not wear dirty clothes especially undies. They are not good for the skin.

I know some clothes are not supposed to be continually washed, but make sure such clothes are dried under the sun and washed after being worn for two or three times and the clothes I mean are clothes like Ankara, Lace, suit and some dark colored Jeans.



Readers are Leaders...

Cleanliness is next to Godliness

Fashion is a way of life...
Ruth Dulac- I just write.

Back to the Basics: Pitfalls To Avoid When Applying Makeup

Hello pals, seems everyone is back from break and everything is up and running. Following our usual makeup tips, handle by Oluchi of FX Makeovers, here's this week’s piece. I hope you enjoy it and learn a thing or two.

Pitfalls to avoid when applying makeup
  • Choosing the wrong concealer shade for the under eye
  • Practicing bad bronzer application
  • Putting on to much blush
  • Skipping primer
  • Wearing mismatched foundation
  • Applying foundation on top of dry, flaky skin
  • Over powdering
   
  1. Just make sure to blend, blend, and blend. That’s one of the biggest problems for girls. Also make sure to blend down your jawline into your neck when applying your foundation. It prevents the very noticeable makeup lines.
  2. Don't rub the makeup from side to side which will actually remove the product from the skin, pat it gently using the index finger, blend with a light tapping motion.
  3.  Don't slather foundation all over the face like moisturizer. 
  4. Remember to blend the hairline, under the jawline, and in front of the ears to avoid a makeup "mask"

I wish you a merry Christmas and a prosperous new year, from your friendly neighborhood addict.                     
Written by: Opara Faith Oluchi
Organization: FX Xculsive Hairs & makeovers
Phone: 07063136661


Sunday, 22 December 2013

Meet Christina of Typearls

Hello friends, on the feature series today we have a young talented lady and organization, Typearls Events N' Crafts. Unlike the usual interview/ Q n' A sessions, today's feature is a profile review. So here we go, meet Typearls.




About
Christina Ty Adegbaju is a Lagos-based events planner with a difference. She is the CEO of “Typearls Events N Craft” an events/venue management and consulting company. She plans and organizes everything from weddings to funerals.

She is also a self-taught craftswoman who designs and creates customized and unique handbags, shoes, Jewelry and assorted fashion accessories; she makes use of both local and international material, depending on her client's taste.

Her clients include high ranking Nigerians and organizations. She has travelled locally and internationally in pursuit of her trade and to gain more knowledge.

She worked as an aviation and safety engineer and as a banking officer but for the last two years joined the fashion/beauty and events industry and is currently making waves. She insists there is lot of beauty in you.

Typearls differentiates itself from competitors because each of our services is inextricably linked to the delivery of the client's core business objectives. Our vision is to be our client's first choice provider of quality, service & value in the global market-place. This ensures that our services engage with the client's strategy and exceed the expectations.

Our Management focuses on the under listed core competencies which are our strategic areas:
  • Events and Venue management
  • Entertainment
  • Beauty and skincare
  • Hostess services
  • Fashion outfit and Ankara accessories
  • Training and consultancy.

Contact:
Corporate offices:
No. 7 Oshin Street, Ikeja, Lagos.
No. 98 Oyo road, Samonda, U.I.  Ibadan, Oyo state.

Tel no: 08038454123, 08034012663, and 07064356819
Email: typearls@gmail.com
www.typearls.gnbo.com;
Twitter: @Typearls
Facebook: www.typearls.events.crafts



THE ART OF BAKING 101

Hello friends, I let out a secret last week that I am a huge fan of good cakes and that we'll be adding great cakes and great designers to the program. Anyways, here it is. If you are a newbie in the cake making industry or just looking get your hands dirty trying out new stuffs, this article is for you. Join Chizzy chops as they take us through the cake process, right from the very basics.

Baking is a science that involves a combination of various chemicals and ingredients. When baking, it’s very important to get your measurement right. The difference between a cup of flour and half a cup could mean that your cake might fall or not form right. It’s interesting to see how a few ingredients transform to become something awesome and delicious. A basic cake recipe is made up of flour, sugar, butter, raising agent and egg.  Flour gives the cake structure and volume, sugar adds sweetness and flavor to any cake. Egg protein coagulates to give structure to baked products. It also adds moisture, flavor and improves the nutritional value of the cake.  Baking powder when combined with liquid produces carbon dioxide which helps to incorporate air and expands the gluten in the flour. The application of heat causes the cake to set while in the risen position. Over the years bakers have come up with a variety of recipes.  All sorts of ingredients are being used to make cakes:  fresh fruits, chocolate, nuts, dried fruits etc. the list is endless.

A basic cake recipe is as follows:



INGREDIENTS:
  • 250g   flour2 tsp. 
  • Baking powder
  • 1 tsp. vanillas extract
  • 200ml milk
  • 250g   butter
  • 250g   sugar

METHOD:
  1. Preheat the oven to 170c. Prepare two 8” cake pans. Grease the pan and dust it lightly with flour.
  2. In a bowl measure your dry ingredients, add the baking powder and set aside. Measure the milk and set aside too.
  3. Cream the butter and sugar with your mixer until light and fluffy.
  4. Next, add eggs one at a time, beat until combined.
  5. Add the vanilla extract.
  6. Add the flour and milk in three batches, starting with flour and ending with flour.
  7. Pour into your prepared pan and bake for 20-25 min. Or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.


Article by: Chizzy Chops
Phone: 08023750029, 08176573132
Bbm: 295fb6ab

Friday, 20 December 2013

Meet Chizzy Chops

Hello friends, featuring on the blog today one of Africa's finest, striving in her own little way make the world a better place. We'll be exploring the world of Mrs. Uzor, a cake maker. I am a huge fan of good cakes and as a result, we are adding cakes to the list of things we do, show casing great cake makers.

Arguably as it may seem, fashion and food and events cannot be totally separated. In between comes the art of cake making.
That said, the first interview on this series, I hope you enjoy it.



9jafrik: Briefly tell us about yourself
Mrs. Uzor: My name is Chioma Uzor; I am married with two children. I studied physics electronics in Federal University of Technology, Minna. I love cooking and baking and I have always loved the kitchen from a tender age. I got distracted along the way. After I left school, I got a banking job, worked for 5 years and finally had the courage to leave and pursue my dreams.

9jafrik: How long have you been in the cake making business?
Mrs. Uzor: For 3 years now.

9jafrik: What were people’s reactions when you chose to leave banking for baking?
Mrs. Uzor: Family members were not surprised because they knew I had a flair for such things. Some people encouraged me, others were indifferent.





9jafrik: Where do you draw your inspiration from?
Mrs. Uzor: Seeing people enjoy my cakes, the expression on their faces when they see a cake, that inspires me. Also cakes by other well established bakers inspire me.

9jafrik: The journey so far, how has it been?
Mrs. Uzor: Hmm, tough, stressful, exciting. I am looking forward to many more years in the profession. Early years in a business are not the easiest. Had to go for trainings, made a lot of free cakes, pricing is also an issue. But our future is bright and we will get there.

9jafrik: Do you have a secret recipe?
Mrs. Uzor: Yes, my chocolate cake yes. I am still working on others though.

9jafrik: On an average, how long does it take to learn how to bake cakes?
Mrs. Uzor: It depends on exposure, the level of practice, as well as creativity. This varies from person to person. As a newbie, it will take about 2 to 3 months to learn.

9jafrik: How's cake making related to fashion?
Mrs. Uzor: Both fashion and baking are arts and they depend on the designer’s imagination, creativity and capabilities.

9jafrik: Who are your role models?
Mrs. Uzor: Buddy Valestro of Cake boss, Christopher Garren of Christopher Garren cakes, the cake girls, Mix and bake owner, Ikiolu Biobaku.

9jafrik: Where do you see yourself in the next 5years?
Mrs. Uzor: Sitting amongst top bakers in the country, baking cakes for governors, presidents and VIP's and running one of the best cake schools in the country.

Contact Details
Location: Lagos
Phone: 08023750029, 08176573132
Bbm: 295fb6ab






Interview with CEO Hormaposh Makeovers

Yippee, I am so glad be back, been working behind the scenes for some time now. So on today's feature series, we present to you one of Africa's talented makeup artist, the executive director of Hormaposh Makeovers. Do enjoy our conversation with her.



9jafrik:  Can we please meet you?
Seyi: My name is Sajuwa Seyi Oma, a native of Ondo state. I am a Lagos based freelance makeup artist; I graduated from Adekunle Ajasin University, studying plant science and biotechnology. I have succeeded in acquiring several other professional certificates including cosmetology and makeup artistry. I am the creative director/beauty consultant at Hormaposh concept. I am a creative person; I love learning and acquiring new skills. I am interested in traveling, meeting people, and dancing. I speak English and Yoruba fluently.

9jafrik: What was growing up like?
Seyi: Hmm... Growing up? It was fun, at some point awful, I was not born with a silver spoon, but I overcame!

9jafrik:
You are a plant scientist, how did you find makeup or how did makeup find you?
Seyi: Makeup was an interest that became a hobby and now a profession. I recall as a young girl I gave fashion styling and makeup advice to my mum and friends. I have a passion for makeup so it's excitement all the way with several criticism and appraisal. I had practiced to beautify and make people feel confident of their look even as a teenager before I became pro.

9jafrik: At what point did you decide to become a pro?
Seyi: When I graduated and found nothing to do.



9jafrik: How long have you been in the business?
Seyi:  I became a pro 3 years ago.

9jafrik: Becoming a pro, how has the journey been so far?
Seyi: It's been full of ups and downs, criticisms and appraisals. In one word, I will say "FUN".

9jafrik:
Have you had any spectacular "flop" moment on the job and do you mind sharing?
Seyi: Yes. It wasn't during a job per-say. It was a competition I went for and because I was not properly informed, I didn't win. There was a look I needed dramatic lashes for, which I didn't go with. I didn't get the look right.

9jafrik: What are the challenges you've faced so far in the industry?
Seyi: Quality makeup is expensive and most clients would not want to pay for it. Some also dictate for you even when they know nothing about makeup; you just have to tolerate them no matter what.

9jafrik: What are a lady's must-have makeup tools?
Seyi: A simple makeup bag containing brush or wedges, powder, eye color, gloss pencil, lipstick, and a concealer if necessary.

9jafrik: Finally, what does it take to be a makeup artist?
Seyi: Passion, patience, tolerance, and hard work

9jafrik: Thanks for your time Seyi

Contact Details

Phone: 08066603797, 08077991656, 08129838887
Twitter: @hormallyd
Bbm: 330b59f7




Friday, 22 November 2013

Back to the Basics: Tools of the Trade (Make Up)

Makeup Tools
Remember using those sponge applicators with play makeup when you were a kid? It's time to ditch those makeup brushes and wands that come packaged with compacts and eye shadow palette. A girl needs the right tools for the job.



BRUSHES: To create a work of art whether on canvas or your eye crease, artist will reach for a brush. Specialized makeup brushes exist to help us apply and blend colors to create different makeup looks. When it comes to makeup brushes, hoard them like a private treasure. Buy as much as you can, having a variety to choose from. Brush heads can be made from natural fibers like squirrel hairs, goat, sable and horse hairs, while others may be synthetic.
Experiment on different brushes, because there is no better way to find your ideal. Also be aware that some people are allergic to certain animal hairs.

Face-brush: They are used to apply foundations, concealers, powders and blush.
  • Foundation Brush: it's always made from synthetic fibers and used to blend foundation on the face. 
  • Concealer Brush: this brush looks like a mini foundation brush and it is smaller than a foundation brush. It is made for covering blemishes or for applying liquid concealers in the hard places at the corners of the eyes.
  • Powder Brush: it comes with large fluffy brush heads and soft bristles, powder brushes are ideal for applying loose powder to the face and also can be used to tone down blusher on the cheek.
  • Blush Brush: they resemble smallish powder brushes with a sloped or rounded tip. Great for applying blush or bronzer to the cheekbone, apply of the cheek or cheek-plane and the T-ZONE.

Eyebrow brushes
There are lots of eye brushes to choose from, which is a blessing for brush hoarders like me.
  • Eyebrow Brush: this brush has a firm angled brush head like the tip of a marker. Used to apply powder, cream or waxes to brows. It is also used to highlight the brows. 
  • Eye shadow Brush: it is not as stuffy as an eyebrow brush. It has a square head used to evenly apply both powder and cream shadows to eyelids.
  • Blending Brush: The heads of blending brushes are usually tapered and this will be your second staple brush (behind your eye shadow brush). They are used to combine different colors of eye shadows.
  • Crease Brush: fluffy and soft, crease brush heads come in different shapes, from thin and tapered to round and fluffy. Look for a brush head that feels soft against your eyelids. This brush can also be used to create a contour at the crease of the eyes.
  • Lip Brushes: This brush provides more control and precise lipstick application than a tube. Like concealer brushes, lip brush has a firm thin tip. For on the go lip-stick application look for a covered lip brush that comes with a cover to protect the brush head while you are traveling.

How to Clean Your Brushes
Regular cleaning of makeup brushes extends their useful life. Some makeup lines sell liquid brush cleaning solutions, but baby shampoo and water also work well. Antibacterial wipes provide a quick way to clean brush heads in the car or wherever water would make a mess. After cleaning your brushes, reshape the brush heads with your fingers and line them up on the edge of a shelf or sink to dry.

How to Store Your Brushes
For cheap, easy brush storage at home, stand them up in a glass (brush heads up). When you're on the road, use a brush roll, which is a folding bag with slots for each brush. It rolls up like a sleeping bag.

Sorry it's long winded, but wanted to give you some good basics..........Have Fun









Written by: Opara Faith Oluchi
Organization: FX Xculsive Hairs & makeovers   
Phone: 07063136661

Thursday, 21 November 2013

Wrapped in Style: KITENGE

I vividly remember growing up and seeing children being tied to their mothers back. It is still common practice for African children to be tied to their mothers back and I bet my mum tied me to her back.
In Africa, the industrious (hard working) nature of the mother cannot be over emphasized. It is also expected that as part of her duties, the child is taken care of. The African child is always close-by.
As an African child, you are on mother's back as she goes to the market, goes visiting, and sometimes pounding. I say kudos to African mothers and mothers all over the world.




Now you may ask, "How's Kitenge associated with the African child?" Kitenge is an African fabric worn by women, wrapped around the chest or used as a baby sling (i.e. used to tie a baby to its mothers back). The Kitenge is a plain weave; light-weight fabric which is high tensioned on wrap and has prints on both sides. The Kitenge design forms a continuous print pattern with no distinct border (they have edgings only on the long side).
Kitenge is worn in African countries such as Uganda, Sudan, Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi, and Zambia.
The Kitenge is inexpensive fabric that serves as a perfect informal piece. It often carries patterns with variety of colors and sometimes political or religious slogans.

In modern times, just like the Ankara fabric, the Kitenge fabric or material can be transformed into something gorgeous and breath-taking in the hands of a good fashion designer.






Tuesday, 19 November 2013

Wrapped in Style(African Textile): MUD CLOTH

It's no news that every tribe in Africa has something unique to offer. Although we are linked in several ways, similarities in language, dressing, color, thinking, and even culture, each tribe presents its colors and unique features and we all fall in love with it. The mud cloth is one those features that confirms the saying "beauty in diversity".



The mud cloth also known as Bògòlanfini or Bogolan is of Malian origin, hand-woven and dyed with fermented mud. It is one of Africa's prestigious clothing, holding great cultural heritage and a Malian identity. The mud cloth is characterized by white geometric designs on black, brown, green, or red background. As the name implies, the mud cloth means cloth derived from the earth (bogolan meaning something made using mud and fini meaning cloth). Traditional, the mud cloth is made by the Bamana who lived to the east of Bamako.
Archeological excavations have been able to prove that the mud cloth dates as far back to the 12th century if not earlier, with some designs depicting historical events of such centuries.




Making of the Mud Cloth
Traditionally, the mud cloth is woven by the men, while women do the dyeing. The whole painting process was done by women. Younger women were taught by their mothers the processes involved, in a long-term apprenticeship. Although in recent times, men have taken up painting of the cloth, basically for tourist attractions, the fact that machine-produced fabrics have taken over cannot be totally ruled out.
The processes (traditional) involved in the making of the mud cloth are as follows:

  • Combing and spinning of locally made cotton into yarns done by women.
  • Weaving of yarns on double-heddle looms to narrow stripes of about 15cm wide, done by men.
  • The strips are cut into shorter pieces which are joined with a whip-stitch, selvedge to selvedge.
  •  The cloth is washed and dried in the sun, mainly to preshrink it.
  • Leafs from Anogeissus leiocarpus and Combretum glutinosum are boiled for few minutes or pounded and soaked for 24 hours. This forms a brown tea that is rich in tannic acid.
  • The cloth piece is then soaked in the tea. It takes a brownish color and is allowed to dry in the sun.
  • Painting using fermented mud collected in previous seasons is carried out. The background surrounding the designs is covered in mud.
  • Excess mud is washed off from the clothing.
  • Soaking, painting, washing, and drying process may be repeated several times, with the mud painted area becoming darker each time.
  • The cloth is then place in the sun for weeks and rewashed.

Mud Cloth Patterns
Just like other African fabrics, every symbol holds a meaning; every cloth has a tale to tell. Next time you see a mud cloth, I hope you'll be able to tell the story behind it.
Some common mud cloth symbols and their meanings/usage:

  • Circles with a dot at the middle: This pattern represents the love and unity of family and community. The dot represents the family in itself, while the circle represents the house of the family.
  • The Iguana's Elbow: The Iguana is believed to be an animal that can lead a hunter to water. The symbol or pattern represents good fortune.
  • Bone of Snakes: This pattern is used to represent bravery.
  • Spindle: Being one of the oldest and popular patterns, the spindle represents the loom used in weaving.
  • Cushion: This pattern represents wealth and luxury.
  • Sickle and Blade (Wosoko): This pattern represent tells a story about a farmer who did an exceptional job.



If you are a fan of African fashion, the mud cloth is a must have for you. Apart from fashion and wearing the mud cloth as a piece of clothing, it can be used for decoration and it provides that perfect finish and touch of Africa.
I hope you enjoyed this post, cheers.



Saturday, 16 November 2013

2neah by 9jafrikfashion: Ankara Accessories

Hello friends, first I must apologize for inconsistencies in my articles of late. The power supply at where I stay became extremely terrible with less than an hour supply of power in two weeks. I think it has been restored because I have had close to 6 hours supply of power. I hope I am forgiven.
That said, on today's episode of 2neah, she considers Ankara Accessories. Although a very brief and concise piece, I know you will love it.

Ankara Accessories
Ankara accessories are one of the many pieces every African lady should have. From bags to earrings, necklaces, shoes, rings, bow ties, and headbands, Ankara patterns are beautiful, catchy and super fun. They make a really bright and bold statement. Ankara accessories are not only for all those special occasions, they can be worn every day to brighten up your outfits. You can wear them with jeans and a top or on a cute dress.




Ankara DIY: DIY stands for do it yourself, you can do a lot of projects with Ankara at home. You can transform your old bracelets by wrapping an Ankara round it or make a bow with Ankara and attach black elastic to make a headband or a bracelet; you can even cover up your old shoes with Ankara. Just be creative and have fun with it.
When wearing Ankara accessories, keep in mind not to match your outfit from head to toe, to avoid looking like a fashion mess. If you are wearing an Ankara outfit and same Ankara pattern on your accessories, tone it down with a black or a neutral colored top or wear a plain gown and glam it up with Ankara accessories.
Ankara accessories is a sure trend that will never go out of style, they are ethnic, beautiful and sure to make a bold statement.






Post by: 2neah
Website: stylerevamp.blogspot.com